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HST 540-011 Espionage: A Modern History course outline

January18

Section 1 (meets Mondays 11-1 and Wednesdays 9-10)

HST 540 001 Course Outline Winter 2016 final

 

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HST 540-021 Espionage: A Modern History course outline

January15

Section 2 (meets Mondays 1-2 and Fridays 2-4)

HST 540 002 Course Outline Winter 2016 final

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HST 504 World Conflict, 1900-1945 Course Outline

September11

HIS 504 World Conflict Fall 2015

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HST 585 Southeast Asia in War and Peace, 1945-present Course Outline

September11

HST 585 Southeast Asia Fall 2015

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HIS 696 History of Terrorism course outline

September9

HIS 696 Terrorism Fall 2015

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HST 540-011 History of Espionage Course Outline W 2015

January12

HST 540 001 Course Outline Winter 2015 final

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HST 540-021 History of Espionage Course Outline W 2015

January9

HST 540 002 Course Outline Winter 2015 final

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HIS 594 World Conflict 1900-1945

September4

The early twentieth century witnessed the breakdown of the international political and economic order. Great power rivalries, an arms race, competition for colonies and markets, and domestic turmoil contributed to the explosion in 1914. The First World War destroyed much of European civilisation by bringing an end to four empires, and greatly weakening the power of several others. Countries like the United States and Japan became key players in the new order. New ideologies and new forms of government developed as a result of the changes, giving rise to even more instability and conflict: evidenced in the rise of Mussolini, Stalin, and Hitler. The global economic crisis in the 1930s brought additional pressures that eventually erupted in another world war between 1939 and 1945. How and why did this happen? Why did Europe self-destruct? What about other countries? This course will explain the enormity of changes that occurred with First World War and the subsequent attempts to re-establish a stable international order in the 1920s and 1930s. We will also examine how and why these attempts failed, and why the Second World War occurred. A wide array of topics and events will be addressed, such as imperialism; nationalism; militarism; technological advancements; pressures for war; the Paris Peace Conference and dismantling of empires; ideological extremism and the rise of Hitler and Stalin; Japan’s conquests in Asia; the Great Depression; American isolationism; appeasement policy; the coming of WWII; the Holocaust; the atomic bomb; “total war”; and the development of a new “cold war” between the United States and the Soviet Union after 1945. In the process, we will examine the historical roots, structures, and problems that shape the international order today.

The full course outline for HIS 594 can be found here:

HIS 594 World Conflict Fall 2014

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HIS 400: Reading, Writing, and Using History

September4

History can be helpful in making sense of the present, but it can also be dangerous. It is often misunderstood, distorted, or even entirely fabricated. The abuse of history is sometimes dramatic and violent. Some have created false histories to justify the exclusion and even extermination of others. Less obvious are the ways we use particular interpretations of history to explain and respond to events. In fact many people invoke “history” without fully understanding what that history is, let alone how easy it is to take from it almost any “lesson” one wants.This course looks at the development of written history, the idea of the “archive,” and the use of written history in the service of ideology, politics, and governance by nation states, empires, social reformers/activists, and corporations. We also look at how history is used to understand ourselves, our families, and societies within the context of the complicated, constantly changing world in which we live. By examining the often precarious nature of history, we can see how it has – and is – used or abused to shape collective memory, identity, and perspective. We will make extensive use of “case studies” to detail the usually contentious complexities of events, and demonstrate how various interpretations of history affect the contemporary world.


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HST 540: Espionage – A 20th Century History

August23

Hidden codes, special devices, fiendish villains, and top secrets. This is the world of James Bond, the CIA, the KGB, and the X-Files. Secret agents and spies have a special place in popular culture, but as alluring as the mythology may be, it does not answer important questions about the role espionage has played, and will continue to play, in international relations. This course examines the evolution of intelligence services throughout the twentieth century, with particular reference to the two world wars, technological changes, and the “Cold War” confrontation after 1945. Special attention in the course will be paid to the role that intelligence played in securing the Allied victory during World War Two, and in crucial Cold War events like the Cuban Missile Crisis and Vietnam War. We will also study numerous historical intelligence failures and how they shaped the world in which we live. The course will explore various realities and perceptions of the intelligence world to examine the processes, see how institutions function, and come to terms with how intelligence is disseminated, employed, and understood. Because of the importance of popular culture in helping to form our understanding of espionage, we will also look at the impact of spy fiction and films in shaping our perceptions of intelligence matters. The course will conclude with an examination of the challenges intelligence services face today, and the future of spying in the post Cold War world. In this regard, the events of September 11, 2001, the current “war on terrorism”, and the many facets of contemporary “national security” discourse will be discussed.

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